Levanger

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"Horse and sledge", bronze sculpture by Oddmund Raudberget 2013
(2014-10-06)

Levanger is the name of a municipality and of the town that is its administrative center. Located on the Trondheim fjord, the town was a trade center for many centuries; traders coming from north and south, but more importantly from Jämtland out east. (Jämtland belonged to Norway till 1645; now it is Swedish.) The goods were transported (at least to and from Jämtland) on horse sledges, therefore the fair took place in winter, beginning the first Monday after 24 February (the traditional feast of St. Matthias the Apostle, the one who replaced Judas Iscariot, you know). The Levanger fair (Marsimartnan) was first mention in writing by Archbishop Olav Engebregtson in 1530, but it probably began about 1170 when the corresponding fair (Gregorymartnan) in Frösön, Jämtland began. This kind of trade subsided in the early 1880s after Östersund (close to Frösön) had got railway connections to both Trondheim and south Sweden, but some of the horse trade continued.

In 1989 the Levanger fair was reestablished and has since been arranged every winter. Its character may have changed, but horses and sledges are still arriving from Sweden. Shortly prior to the Levanger fair there is a similar traditional fair in Røros, and two weeks after the Levanger fair Gregorymartnan in Jämtland begins, now having moved to Östersund.

coat of arms

The Levanger coat of arms. The horse symbolizes the trade (i.e. transport), but also the horse trade in particular.



Levanger street

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From the main street, Kirkegata. This has always been a wooden town, and after the great fires in 1846, 1865, 1877, and 1897, most houses were rebuilt from wood. The authorities are in a process of preserving about 200 houses in the town.
(2014-10-06)

Levanger train station

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The train station. The railway reached Levanger in 1904.
(2014-10-05)

Levanger church

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The church seen from the bridge across Sundet (the Strait).
(2014-10-06)

Levanger sculpture

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"Girl and boy", sculpture by Arne Durban 1964 in the "upper park" (Sejersted's park).
(2008-09-26)

Levanger sculpture

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"2 Roe deer", sculpture by Skule Waksvik 2011.
(2014-10-05)

Levanger

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(A less nice picture.) Stauplia is the name of a hill on the northwest side of Sundet (the Strait), the town center being on the southeast side. It is a public area with fertile (calciferous) soil. It is forested, partly with trees from a warmer climate, including what is claimed to be the northmost beech grove in the world. There are plenty of benches for resting, and this year a path, excellent for exercise, has been built. The only trouble is that the shrubs and trees grow faster than it is possible to have them cut down, and the splendid view has disappeared. (Regrettably, that's the common situation throughout the country.) Here you see a glimpse of the Strait with the bridge, a part of the Levanger town, and you may dimly perceive the farmland beyond.
(2014-10-06)

Levanger monastery ruins

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On Munkeby (=abode of the monks), about six kilometers east of the town, at the Levanger river, the ruins of a church is an attraction. A monastery, now completely disappeared, and the church, was built by Cistercian monks during 1150–1180, but in 1207 they moved to the Tautra monastery. Afterwards, until a fire in 1587, the church was used by the parish. Later it was used as a quarry.
(2014-10-05)

In 2009 a new Cistercian monastery was establish in the neighborhood, the Munkeby Mariakloster.

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